Earth Day 2017

Earthday2017

Since the first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, millions of people continue to bring awareness and solutions to local and global environmental concerns. This year there is a March for Science and teach ins regarding current issues facing our environment.

Radio stations across the nation are playing a role, gathering communities for common causes and helping spread the word. It’s fascinating to see the variety of topics that are covered: trail creation and maintenance, clean water, community clean ups and restoration projects, gardening and invasive plant education, alternative energy and endangered species awareness.

Here’s just a few events (there are literally thousands and it seems almost every city has some opportunity to volunteer).

http://sunradio.com/2017/03/26/earth-day-2017/
http://www.espn1320.net/events/cspf-earth-day-2017
http://nwpr.org/post/earth-day-northwest
http://www.radiowoodstock.com/amp-events/earth-day-volunteering-celebration/

How do you plan to participate in Earth Day? Does your community have an event? Enter you answer in the comments below and be entered to win the CC Solar Observer AM, FM, Weather Wind Up and Solar Powered Radio. Drawing will be held April 25th. Please only one entry per person.

Local Radio Still Matters

wearebroadcasters_2017_infographic

Image used with permission from National Broadcasters Association

Do you remember when you could call up your local radio station and ask to dedicate a song?  Maybe you just wanted to start a friend’s day right with their favorite tune, or wanted that special someone to know you were thinking of them.  Regardless of your sentiments, there was the thrill of knowing everyone listening for miles around heard your name and theirs over the air waves.  And if you were lucky enough to get on air yourself, you tried to come up with something aside from “This is for Tony, because he’s so cool!”, but choked on the spot instead.

Today our existence is filled with signals and public sharing, so feeling like part of the world at large is easy.  Quick as a flash, half the planet can watch that video you posted of your grandchild sticking cereal up their nose.  But for a price.  You have to pay someone for that connection, and in some way they are using your profile to make money.

Luckily, some things have not changed.  Radio broadcasts are still free and quite prolific.  According to the web site www.wearebroadcasters.com, there are 15,516 full power radio stations in the U.S., that are listened to by more than 268 million Americans each week.

According to a response to a survey from PoytnerThe purpose of local is to see, know, care about and understand your community. C. Crane believes that local radio is at the heart of every community and this sentiment is consistently reinforced when we talk to radio listeners every day. We recently experienced it first hand when our Fortuna High Varsity Basketball team traveled to the North Coast Section playoffs – below is the testimonial from one of our staff:

My son is playing in the North Coast Section’s basketball playoffs this evening in San Francisco. I didn’t travel this time and was so bummed out that I wouldn’t be able to watch or hear the game. I have been unable to find any source of live streaming or local or online televised broadcast BUT our local guy Tag Wotherspoon will be down there covering the game on 95.1 FM so I’ll be able to listen. This is the only local radio station that covers any of the local high school sports and I am so grateful.

Local radio continues to serve their community – they announce the local events, tell you who is playing at what venues, help you decide where to go for dinner and the local news highlights what issues are specific to the area you are in. If you’re lucky enough to be a sports fan in a town with a professional team, you might find yourself watching the game on television, but listening to your local announcer call the play by play on the radio.  If you are further interested in this topic, The National Association of Broadcasters has a very informative web site with information on the status of issues that affect radio listeners.

C. Crane has many options for you to take advantage of those free signal broadcasts.  Our radios are made with the listener in mind, and we can help you determine which model would best suit your needs.  We know that radio has the unique ability to entertain, inform and connect and appreciate the opportunity to help you stay connected to your community.

Please share with us – Does local radio matter to you and if so why?

The Month for Thanksgiving

begrateful

This is the month to reflect on all that we have and what we are truly grateful for, to get in the spirit we wanted to find out which radio show, host or station you are most thankful for! Enter in the comments below and be entered to win the product of your choice (excluding the AEGO sound systems).  Drawing will be held November 30th. Please one entry per person.

And the winner of the CC Skywave Radio is…

© Frankljunior | Dreamstime.com - Air Traffic Control Tower And An Airplane Photo

© Frankljunior | Dreamstime.com – Air Traffic Control Tower And An Airplane Photo

Thank you all for your participation in our What is Airband (Aviation Band) on a Radio? blog post. There were a lot of wonderful comments and stories submitted. So many that we wish we had time for honorable mentions. Thank you all! If you didn’t have a chance to read some of the comments, we highly recommend taking a peek 🙂

We won’t leave you hanging any longer…. and the winner of What is Airband (Aviation Band) on a Radio? Tell us your best airline story isKathleen B Amptmann! Kathleen will receive the CC Skywave Radio

Wahoo Kathleen! Thank you for your great and entertaining story. It had everyone here at C. Crane in both stitches and ready to heave 🙂 It was fantastic, thank you!

Kathleen B Amptmann Says:

‘I was a 20 year old “Stewardess” back when Ozark Airlines was still flying. On one of my first flights (only 1 cabin crew per flight), working the DC3, a nice elderly man pushed the overhead help button for the second time. I had retrieved a sick bag from him earlier in the flight.
When flying in the old DC3 prop planes there were always more than a few sick bags to be collected. Procedure was to store them back in the “blue room” for the ground service folks to remove on the next stop. I guessed the gentleman had another bag for me to stow. This leg of the trip had been rough & there were about 8 other such bags lined up against the wall. When I got to the mans seat I had to lean down to hear what he was saying. When it dawned on me what his request was I almost reached for my own bag. Seems he had accidentally lost his false teeth into the bag I had already picked up. He needed his teeth & wanted me to check his bag & bring them back to him!
I explained that would be difficult as he wasn’t the only one who was airsick! He understood my dilemma. Fortunately he agreed to check the bags if I brought them to him, 2 at a time!
I felt sorry about his mishap but lucky for him, he located them in the 4th bag…it could have been worse! To this day, every time I remember this event I smile & then go wash my hands!’