September is National Preparedness Month

September is Emergency Preparedness month. By now, if you don’t already have your emergency kit ready, here are a few tips from the C. Crane Family that may help you out.

Make a plan

Create a plan for yourself, your family and your pets. Plan how to stay safe and how you will communicate during a major disaster.

Emergency Preparedness KitCreate your Emergency Preparedness Kit

Food and Water is a Must

Have at least one gallon of drinking water per person per day for at least 3 days. Have at least a 3 day supply of non-perishable food and a can opener (that’s a must have tool). If you have pets make sure you have food and water for them too.

Emergency Radio with extra batteries.

A reliable way to stay informed at all times during an emergency is with an all hazards weather radio. Radio communication will always stay in operation, with reliable sources like Ham Operators. Ham Operators are local and have equipment ready to help coordinate emergency efforts. The CC Radio 2E is C. Crane’s all hazards AM, FM, Weather and Weather Alert with the 2 Meter Ham Band Radio. It will keep the information flowing. The CC Solar Observer is also a fantastic emergency radio. It covers AM, FM and the Weather band, and can be powered by using the built in hand crank, by the built-in solar panel or by using regular alkaline batteries. It comes with a built in flashlight, and in an emergency, it can charge cell phones. Also make sure you have plenty of extra batteries on hand.

The perfect light to add to your Preparedness Kit

Do have the right light so you can see in a power outage? The New, advanced CC LED Spot XB Spotlight’s brightness is nearly equal to a 100 watt old style incandescent spotlight, and it’s 3 times brighter than our previous model CC LED Spotlight. Not only is the CC LED Spot XB exceptionally bright but it will run with usable light for up to 60 hours. The CC LED Spot XB is lightweight and easy to use. Also, the Unity Plus LED Flashlight is a reliable flashlight to have in your emergency kit. Its light weight, runs on 2 C batteries and will give you up to 22 hours of usable light. The Unity Plus is rugged and is the perfect combination of power, size and weight.

First Aid Kit

Keep it simple. Nothing big, but make sure you have Band-Aids, a bandage wrap, antiseptic, moist and dry towelettes and tweezers in your emergency kit.

Tool Kit

Keep a wrench and pliers in your kit to turn off utilities like gas and water. Also a fire starter that will help to start a fire to help keep you warm.

Personal Items

Keep prescription medications, clothing, blankets and hygiene items in your kit. You don’t know how long you will be put out and being without these items could be life threatening.

Show us what you’ve got

Share this post on Facebook (see share button below) with a picture of your emergency kit or comment on our C. Crane Facebook page with #emergencypreparednesskit2015 and also comment on our blog post with the number one most important item you have in your emergency kit.

You will automatically be entered into a drawing to win a NEW CC Spot XB LED Spotlight. One entry per person. Drawing will be held October 15th.

Happy First Day of Autumn

Happy First Day of Autumn From the C. Crane Family

First Day of Autumn

What I will hear on the 2-Meter Amateur Radio Band

International competition on the VHF radio become a tradition for a long time. These competitions are held the first weekend in July. Typically, operators of amateur radio stations go out of town - to field, and from there carry out radio communications. On the picture are operators from Russia, at the field day 2011 year Photo taken July 2, 2011

International competition on the VHF radio become a tradition for a long time. These competitions are held the first weekend in July. Typically, operators of amateur radio stations go out of town to field, and from there carry out radio communications. Pictured are Ham Operators from Russia, at the Field Day 2011 Photo taken July 2, 2011

What is the 2-Meter Amateur Radio band anyway?

According to Wikipedia, “The 2 meter amateur radio band is a portion of the VHF (very high frequency) Spectrum, comprising of frequencies stretching from 144.000 MHz to 148.000 MHz.” These communications are generally FM or frequency modulated transmissions although some operators do operate using SSB (single sideband) or CW (Morse code). These modes of operation allow for longer distance communications without the use of repeater stations.

While listening to the 2-meter ham band you can expect to hear normal conversations or “rag chew” as the hams call it. You may also hear a ham operator on his way home from work asking his wife if she needs anything from the store. You may hear a ham operator reporting a traffic accident and requesting emergency services.

You may also hear ham radio operators providing on the scene emergency communications during times of disaster. Often you will hear a ham operator reporting on conditions long before the general public has been advised of the situation via the normal news media. Even before you hear the information listening to a police or emergency services scanner you have already heard about the situation if you are monitoring the 2-meter ham band.

Ham Operators coordinate emergency efforts. SSB (or Single Side Band AM) transmits in long distances. The 2-Meter Ham band can have similar type local broadcasts but is normally much clearer audio and is FM.

The 2-Meter Amateur band frequencies are reserved for the exclusive use of those licensed in the United States by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) as Amateur Radio Operators or “Ham Radio Operators”. Ham radio operators use the 2-meter band for general conversations as well as for emergency communications. Ham radio operators are often the first called upon to assist in major disasters with communications between the public and emergency services such a law enforcement, fire and emergency medical services. The American Red Cross has recognized that the 2-Meter Amateur band is a very effective way of providing communications during times of emergency and Ham radio operators provide 90% of the coordination efforts during a major emergency. During an emergency a 2-Meter band receiver could save your life or that of a loved one.

How does the 2-Meter Amateur Radio Band work?

In most communities, the local Ham radio operators own and maintain repeaters on the 2-meter band, which assists their communications by increasing the distance that they can communicate with each other while still maintaining the quality of an FM transmission. These repeater stations are located in high locations such as mountaintops or tall buildings in the big cities and consist of a powerful transmitter and a high-gain antenna allowing Ham operators to extend their coverage areas, often as much as 200 miles or more. These stations often have alternative forms of power such as generators, solar power and batteries, which keep them in operation when the commercial power supply has been discontinued due to weather or other disasters. Individual ham operators have also found alternative power sources for their equipment so that they can operate even when there is no commercial power available.

Ham radio operators are very inventive in their approach to communications and can often find a way to communicate when normal communications such as cell phones have been interrupted. As an example, Ham radio operators have been able to make phone calls using the 2-meter band for many years before the invention of the cellular telephone.

More information about the 2-Meter Amateur Radio Band.

Because it is local and reliable, and because the licensing requirements to transmit on the 2-meter band are easy to meet in the United States and many other countries, this band is the most popular Amateur Radio band in the United States. The 2-meter band is often the band on which Ham radio operators make their first contacts. Obtaining a Ham operator’s license consists of taking a simple test containing 35 questions covering such topics as operating procedures, rules and regulations and some minor electronics theory. There is no requirement to pass a Morse code test to be licensed to operate on the 2-meter amateur radio band. 2-meter radio equipment is also very affordable and can be as simple as a small hand held transceiver or a powerful base or mobile transceiver. This popularity also means that it is the most often used band for emergency communications such as providing emergency communications between Red Cross shelters and local authorities. Many neighborhood disaster relief organizations use the 2-Meter Amateur Radio band for their official communications during times of emergency.

To learn more about 2-Meter Ham radio and what is required to obtain a license contact the ARRL (American Radio Relay League) at or call (860) 594-0300. They can provide you with local contacts for training classes in your area and test dates and locations. Your local Amateur Radio Club members will assist you in all aspects of obtaining your license including what type of equipment you need to get started. Also a gentleman named Gordon West would love to help you get started in ham radio. He has a school you can attend in Southern California (Gordon West Radio School) or you can order study materials from the W5YI Group at Bob Crane recommends Gordon West’s course materials as they are extremely well written, while making it enjoyable to learn. Mr. West will even take a phone call if you have a question. Also take a look at our C. Crane blog post The Importance of HAM Amateur Radio by Tim Carter, Ask the Builder . He has a great story about Ham Operators and how important they are in aiding in emergency efforts. You will discover that Ham radio operators are a great bunch of people. They provide this irreplaceable public service for free.

W5YI : Your Resource for Amateur Radio and Commercial Radio
Technician Class: 2006-10 FCC Element 2 Amateur Radio License Preparation – By Gordon West WB6NOA.

Happy Labor Day

Labor DayLabor Day weekend is upon us, it’s the symbolic end of summer and the last three-day weekend for a while. We predict about a million barbeque grills will be lit this weekend with tunes blaring and friends gathering in celebration that fall will be here soon and summer is coming to an end.

While Labor Day Weekend might mean the unfortunate end of summer, it also means it’s almost time for football to come back! The beginning of the NFL and College football seasons means Sunday football, NFL Ticket, Fantasy Leagues and national radio coverage! How will you be tuning in?

Not only can you receive coverage from your local broadcaster but there are several radio broadcasters and podcasters interviewing various former players and current coaches on the field. Here are a few of our top picks:


The CC Radio 2E has exceptional voice clarity for talk radio and the speaker sounds as if the broadcasters are in the same room.

Internet Radio also offers a flurry of NFL highlights and updates. The CC WiFi 2 receives TuneIn and offers a plethora of free stations to pick up NFL info. Here are just a few:

Worried you’ll miss out listening to your favorite broadcaster while at the big game? Fear not, the CC Pocket Radio makes for a compact travel companion! It receives great reception and is so small it will fit in any pocket or carry pouch. Tune in to your favorite broadcaster while sitting live at the big game!

Whatever you decide to do this Labor Day Weekend, you absolutely deserve a day off to recognize your effort and enjoy the fruits of your labor. Before getting back to the grindstone on Tuesday, enjoy that last big barbecue, tunes from the music box and the last final weekend of your summer. Happy Labor Day from the C. Crane Family!

Preparation for All Hazards

The northwest fires this season have been unbearable. Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and of course California have all been states that are greatly affected by these fires with more fires in other states across the U.S. popping up daily. So far this year, more than 7.4 million acres have been burned by wildfires. Firefighters have come from as far away as Australia and New Zealand to battle the blazes across the Pacific Northwest.

Photo credit: Trinity Ridge fire, August 24, 2012, photo by Kari Greer for USFS

Photo credit: Trinity Ridge fire, August 24, 2012, photo by Kari Greer for USFS





In our neck of the woods here in Northern California, Humboldt and Trinity Counties have been severely affected by these wildfires. Homes have been lost, gorgeous acres of hundred year old redwood trees are gone, livestock has perished, crops are destroyed and unfortunately it’s still not contained. The smoke in the area reminds us daily how bad fire season really is. The devastation hits too close to home.

In some areas nature took over, scattering dry lightning storms that has caused most of the destruction. Other areas were not affected by natural causes, but by not knowing the simple precautions to take to avoid a devastation like this, a disaster can happen at any time.

Current known wildfires sparked by lightning in the Humboldt County region. Graphic: Calfire HUU

Current known wildfires sparked by lightning in the Humboldt County region. Graphic: Calfire HUU

Everyone hears how important is it to be prepared, but how seriously do you take it? Do you have a plan? Having stored food and water is a priority for survival but what about staying informed when all communication is down? Radio has been a solid form of communication when cellular services were not available in the rural areas affected. Your local radio stations are the most likely sources for up to the minute information on what’s happening and evacuation information that’s critical for survival. This is why the all Hazards CC Radio 2 E is a necessity to have on hand during any emergency.


Here are a few great tips to help avoid the start of wildfires:
• Design and landscape your home with wildfire safety in mind. Select materials and plants that can help contain fire rather than fuel it.
• Regularly clean roof and gutters.
• Inspect chimneys at least twice a year and clean them at least once a year.
• Install a dual-sensor smoke alarm on each level of your home, especially near bedrooms; test monthly and change the batteries at least once each year.
• Teach each family member how to use a fire extinguisher (ABC type) and show them where it’s kept.
• Clear items that will burn from around the house, including wood piles, lawn furniture, barbecue grills, tarp coverings, etc. Move them outside of your defensible space.
• Identify and maintain an adequate outside water source such as a small pond, cistern, well, swimming pool, or hydrant.
• Have a garden hose that is long enough to reach any area of the home and other structures on the property.
Find more useful tips to help you before, during and after a fire by clicking here: .

No matter what the emergency is whether they are fires, snowstorms, floods, hurricanes, landslides, or earthquakes – any natural disaster, we encourage you to check your kit and plan and if you don’t have one, make one.

Let us help you start your emergency kit. Comment on our blog with the necessities you’ll need for your survival emergency kit for you and your family members. What do you want the closest members of your family to have to stay safe? One winner will have the choice of either the CC Solar Observer AM/FM/Weather Windup Emergency Radio or the CC Skywave AM/FM/Shortwave/ Weather with Aviation Portable Travel Radio in addition to the Power Vivid Pocket Flashlight and the Unit Plus LED Flashlight. One entry per person. Drawing will be held September 15th.

Congratulations to the blog post winner Emma for commenting on our post Preparations for All Hazards! You have your choice of the CC Solar Observer AM/FM/Weather Windup Emergency Radio or the CC Skywave AM/FM/Shortwave/ Weather with Aviation Portable Travel Radio. Congratulations and thanks to all who participated!

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Back to School Must Haves This Season

Whether your kids or grandBacktoSchoolkids are starting pre-kindergarten or taking their first steps into college this fall, send them back to school with the right gear and most helpful must haves for the year. We can help you find the best electronic equipment to keep your scholar connected through the entire year.

The Necessities

Radios aren’t just for adults
Give your kid the opportunity to open up an entire new world of radio listening. The internet is great but your kids may not have considered listening to the radio as an amazing wealth of knowledge and information. Kids love music on FM and their MP3 players but introducing a bit of AM talk radio into their lives may do major justice. The information is endless on the AM dial. The CC Pocket Radio is small and compact so the size will be familiar and it fits into any size backpack. The CC Pocket Radio offers AM, FM, Weather and Weather Alert. 

Why would my kid need a radio, they have a cell phone
Kids may have the impression that their cell phones will always keep them informed but whether or not we’d like to admit it, we all know an emergency can happen at any time and cellular communication may go down. A reliable way to stay informed at all times during an emergency is with an all hazards weather radio. Radio communication will always have the ability to stay in operation with reliable sources like Ham Operators. Ham Operators are local and have equipment ready to help coordinate emergency efforts. The CC Radio 2 E is C. Crane’s all hazards AM, FM, Weather and Weather Alert with the 2 Meter Ham Band Radio that will stay up and keep information flowing. The CC Solar Observer is also a fantastic emergency radio that comes with AM, FM, the Weather band and can be powered by using the built in hand crank, solar panel or by using regular alkaline batteries. It also comes with a built in flashlight and in an emergency it can charge cell phones.

A Flashlight can save your life
Having a reliable flashlight on your key chain or in your bag can be a lifesaver. The Power Vivid Pocket Flashlight is small, light-weight and will provide a large amount of light to see by. Never be too cautious when it comes to staying lit. The Unity Plus Flashlight is a beefier version. It’s larger and puts out more light but it can also act as a self-defense tool with its firm grip and rigid top. It’s the perfect combo of power, size and weight.

The Fun Stuff

Tricked Out Dorm Room
Turn any dorm room from a dull den to a chic chill zone by livening up the place up with a small and portable, Bluetooth® speaker. The Senta Ally Portable Speaker with FM will fill any room with rich, full range sound. Its generous battery time will last hours and hours. Connection via Bluetooth makes listening to music endless and it comes with all the cables necessary to connect to anything from cell phones, to tablets, to laptops.

Beef Up the WiFi
The School’s WiFi can be hard to receive and depending on location, almost impossible. A WiFi Antenna can be your internet savior. The Super WiFi Antenna 3 will receive a WiFi signal from hundreds of feet away and will significantly boost the WiFi to your computer or laptop. Couple the Super WiFi Antenna 3 with our Repeater to create the Super WiFi Repeater Kit that will connect multiple WiFi devices. Free WiFi normally surrounds campuses so a good WiFi antenna is a priority to stay connected.

Now that we’ve given you a few back to school tips, we want to know what your back to school must haves will be this school year. Let us know what’s on your school shopping list and you’ll be entered to win a C. Crane back to School Starter Kit filled with a few necessities any scholar would need. One entry per person. Drawing will be held September 3rd.

Congratulations to winner Paul Walker! You will be receiving the Senta Ally Bluetooth Speaker, a pair of CC Buds, the Power Vivid Pocket Flashlight as well as a pair of AA batteries.

Summer is for Travel

beachsummerrevisedWith summer in full swing, we know many of you are on the go. Whether you’re traveling for your bucket list, to visit family or for a little R&R, C. Crane has a few things that you can use to make your travels more enjoyable.

For news and information, the CC Skywave is hard to beat. It will also keep you informed of the weather with weather alerts. It’s the perfect size to stash in your travel bag regardless of your mode of travel. If you want something a little simpler, the CC Pocket might be the right choice. We’ve had several customers who mention using it on the golf course or by the pool.

What fun is the destination without some music? The Senta Ally is a versatile portable Bluetooth Speaker. Use your smartphone with your favorite app to transmit music to the Ally or you can connect a device directly through the line in, or even load your playlist onto an SD card or USB thumb drive. This is great for the lake, on the patio boat, by the pool, at the river or the beach. It’s small enough to easily throw in your towel bag.

Traveling to campgrounds or RV parks that have WiFi or even some hotels – the range isn’t always very good. Use one of our WiFi antennas or the Super WiFi Repeater Kit to get the range you need. We have a great explanation on the different options and how to pick the one that is best suited for your situation.

If camping or hiking is more your style, the Unity Plus LED Flashlight is one of the best or even the Power Vivid Pocket LED Flashlight. Long battery life and easy operation. Everyone will be asking where you got yours. They are an essential part of the camping or hiking pack.

Wherever your summer takes you, we hope you make the most of it!

We love a good story, and you guys have given us some great ones! Vacations are some of the best stories (sometimes for calamity). Tell us your favorite vacation story in the comments and be entered to win any one of the products mentioned above. One entry per person. Drawing will be held August 12th.

Congratulations to Jason Vanderveen who is the winner in our drawing for our blog post Summer is for Travel. Thanks to everyone who participated! ~Jessyca M.  from C. Crane

Why We Made the First CCRadio


Select-A-Tenna – AM Antenna

After C. Crane started to gain momentum selling mostly antennas and radio accessories, we received our first real technological challenge when customers starting asking for recommendations on the best radio. It was pretty easy to select the Sangean 803A as the first radio we offered to our customers. Tuning was precise and voice audio was sharper and more legible than most other radios on the market. With the Select-A-Tenna that we sold, it turned into one of the best radios made for reception. It was a little complex to use as a regular daily radio but it met many customer’s needs. We also carried the GE Super Radio which was much easier to use but lacked some of the functionality customer’s wanted and supply was erratic. It seemed that there wasn’t a good blend of features, performance and ease of use.

In the background we went about acquiring and testing just about every popular radio made at the time. It turns out that most radios are tuned for music and FM. There are many that have too much bass or filtering which distorts the human voice for talk radio and even voices found in music tracks. It turned out nobody was making a radio that made voices sound realistic and very few had good reception. If they did, they were so complicated that you needed a PhD just to turn it on or they were so expensive you needed a small loan to pay for it. It took 10 years to convince a manufacturer to help us make the radio we knew our customers needed and wanted. Something that had some of the most desired functionality (memory presets, clock, alarm), audio tuned for voice, excellent reception and wasn’t too difficult to use.

ccradio2eWe started the CCRadio by selecting a speaker and an amplifier designed to react well with voice frequencies. Trying to make a sensitive radio that picked up weak stations was the real challenge. The new solid state chips generated their own static noise that masked the weak signal so that is all you heard. It took months to reduce the noise and make the radio quiet so a weak station was above the noise level. The original CCRadio was introduced in July of 1998 and we haven’t looked back. Grandma Faye gave the best compliment; “you can hear the voices with this radio”. It’s gone through a few different iterations based on customer feedback and changes in technology but the idea behind it remains and it continues to be one of the most popular radios we offer. Models based on our design are still popular worldwide. It took several more years but we eventually invented and received a patent for the Twin Coil Ferrite AM antenna. This allowed us to exceed the reception of our original AM antenna and radio.

Our line of CC Radios has expanded to include different types and styles but the focus on reception and audio remains.

In honor of our anniversary month, 17 years of CCRadios, you can enter to win, tell us your favorite radio story in the comments on this blog and win the CCRadio of your choice. Drawing will be held July 31st. Only one entry per person.

Congratulations to Bob Emery for sharing his favorite radio story! Thanks to everyone who participated! ~Jessyca

Art Bell. . . What the heck is he doing? He is going back on air July 20th, 2015!

Midnight in the Desert Art BellArt Bell will be broadcasting on Internet radio, shortwave and even some regular radio stations! What a wonderful unorthodox blend! He is dramatically reducing the number of commercial breaks so it will be very interesting how this meshes with a traditional broadcast station. Keep up with latest news and station list at

Where can I hear him? Most people may already have their favorite way to listen but if not here are some tips:

The inherent streaming quality of Art’s stereo broadcast is high. You can listen on a phone, tablet, Internet radio, Shortwave or perhaps even a local station. Shortwave station WTWW at 5085 KHz puts out a powerful signal so those beyond any services can hear him. The small CC Skywave radio with 10′ of wire attached to the whip antenna works excellent along with our larger CCRadio-SW.

You can also listen to Dark Matter Digital Network on the CC WiFi Radio or the CC WiFi 2 Radio (available in classic black or gorgeous cherry wood finish).

How can I make Art’s audio stream sound great on a tablet or smartphone?


  • The Senta Ally Stereo Speaker can use Bluetooth or a patch cord from your smart phone. Audio on the Ally is particularly accurate and full for voice. Our price and the fact that it is portable make it a great value.
  • My “spoiled brat-best way” to listen in bed is a tablet directly connected to my CCRadio-2E for impeccable voice rendition. We offer a 1/8″ stereo 3′ heavy duty patch cord that works well for this and other similar devices.


  • If you have a tendency to mangle and destroy headphones you should try our low cost Voz. Many people think they are the finest for voice.
  • For audio connoisseurs check out the Senta-40 at a price that defies the quality.


  • The Voz Earbuds are inexpensive but normally better than what you may have received with your smartphone.
  • Art Bell’s Hot Pick: The highly rated Voz-P Premium Wooden Earbuds are his favorite.
  • The CC Buds are a new invention of C. Crane that are tuned for voice but also accurate for music without heavy bass.

Tips for Extending WiFi Reception:

Crane has always specialized in long range reception and WiFi is no exception!

Art Bell is on 9-12 PM Pacific Time but you may not have good WiFi reception where you like to listen. There are inexpensive repeaters you can find that work very good for 30′ or more from your router. I particularly like Netgear’s wallplug repeater. But If you have a serious problem making an internet connection then C. Crane has some very powerful solutions to check out.

Good ‘Ole AM/FM Radio:

You can check out the station list on and see if you can get any signal. The CCRadio-2E is probably the best radio for reception.

Art’s new show has all the signs of a great ride and the future is downright bright and mysterious at the same time. Please join the show!

If we can be of any help, please give us a call. That’s the job we love doing!

Why AM Listening is Better at Night

If you listen to AM radio stations at night that are just impossible to pick up during the day, chances are you’re benefiting from sky-wave propagation. Propagation is just the technical word for how radio signals travel through the air. Sky-wave propagation is the specific name given to radio waves that travel through the sky. Sky-wave propagation takes place between sunset and sunrise. It’s the flip side to the ground wave propagation used to transmit during the day.

During the day, ground wave propagation is preferable because the radiation from the sun causes so much ionization that radio signals sent into the air are absorbed into the atmosphere. When atoms in the D region of the ionosphere are ionized, you end up with free electrons and ions floating around in the air. It’s kind of like trying to walk through a room filled with dancing couples. When in pairs, there’s more room to walk through, but when they’re not paired, it’s easier to get stuck in a conversation with someone. That’s kind of how the ions and electrons in the D region work. When they’re not combined they look for something else to combine with and that’s how they absorb radio waves. At night, however, once the sun begins to set, the electrons and ions in the D region recombine rapidly – leaving more room for the radio waves to travel a little farther up. Above the D region, the F1 and F2 regions are also recombining, but much more slowly than the D region. When the radio waves hit those regions of the ionosphere, they have a chance to be reflected or bent (some prefer refracted) back toward the earth.


What that means for AM radio listeners is that they’ve experienced the remarkable ability of AM radio signals to travel hundreds of miles farther than during the day. Listening to AM, and scanning the AM dial between sunrise and sunset is a fun way to discover how far a sky-wave signal can travel to reach you. During the baseball season, you can use the sky-wave to tune in some night games played in different parts of the country. In Northern California (where C. Crane is based), as in other places around the country (even up into Alaska), people use the sky-wave to listen to stations like KGO which is a 50,000 watt station located in San Francisco. If a signal reflects off the ionosphere and then bounces off the earth and then reflects off the ionosphere again, it can travel even farther than with just a single reflection. So, as you can see, sky-wave propagation makes it possible to tune in stations that you might not even know about when tuning your radio during the day.

If you ever come across a DX website, or even a shortwave radio website, where someone is really happy about intense solar activity (or lots of sun spots), it’s because more ionization during the day makes for better sky-wave propagation during the night.

If you want to make the most of sky-wave propagation, we’d suggest the CCRadio-2E and if you’re into shortwave, our CCRadio-SW is also an excellent choice. Since these radios have fine tuning capabilities, thanks to the built-in Twin Coil Ferrite® AM Antenna, you may be able to find a new station almost every night. A smaller version that works great for portability would be the CC Skywave. It’s a lot more fun than you might realize, with something as simple as a radio. Here’s a sample personal station log you can use to keep track of what you hear.

We’d love to hear how far away you’ve received an AM signal from its source, and on what radio!

Happy DXing


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