Local Radio Still Matters

wearebroadcasters_2017_infographic

Image used with permission from National Broadcasters Association

Do you remember when you could call up your local radio station and ask to dedicate a song?  Maybe you just wanted to start a friend’s day right with their favorite tune, or wanted that special someone to know you were thinking of them.  Regardless of your sentiments, there was the thrill of knowing everyone listening for miles around heard your name and theirs over the air waves.  And if you were lucky enough to get on air yourself, you tried to come up with something aside from “This is for Tony, because he’s so cool!”, but choked on the spot instead.

Today our existence is filled with signals and public sharing, so feeling like part of the world at large is easy.  Quick as a flash, half the planet can watch that video you posted of your grandchild sticking cereal up their nose.  But for a price.  You have to pay someone for that connection, and in some way they are using your profile to make money.

Luckily, some things have not changed.  Radio broadcasts are still free and quite prolific.  According to the web site www.wearebroadcasters.com, there are 15,516 full power radio stations in the U.S., that are listened to by more than 268 million Americans each week.

According to a response to a survey from PoytnerThe purpose of local is to see, know, care about and understand your community. C. Crane believes that local radio is at the heart of every community and this sentiment is consistently reinforced when we talk to radio listeners every day. We recently experienced it first hand when our Fortuna High Varsity Basketball team traveled to the North Coast Section playoffs – below is the testimonial from one of our staff:

My son is playing in the North Coast Section’s basketball playoffs this evening in San Francisco. I didn’t travel this time and was so bummed out that I wouldn’t be able to watch or hear the game. I have been unable to find any source of live streaming or local or online televised broadcast BUT our local guy Tag Wotherspoon will be down there covering the game on 95.1 FM so I’ll be able to listen. This is the only local radio station that covers any of the local high school sports and I am so grateful.

Local radio continues to serve their community – they announce the local events, tell you who is playing at what venues, help you decide where to go for dinner and the local news highlights what issues are specific to the area you are in. If you’re lucky enough to be a sports fan in a town with a professional team, you might find yourself watching the game on television, but listening to your local announcer call the play by play on the radio.  If you are further interested in this topic, The National Association of Broadcasters has a very informative web site with information on the status of issues that affect radio listeners.

C. Crane has many options for you to take advantage of those free signal broadcasts.  Our radios are made with the listener in mind, and we can help you determine which model would best suit your needs.  We know that radio has the unique ability to entertain, inform and connect and appreciate the opportunity to help you stay connected to your community.

Please share with us – Does local radio matter to you and if so why?

Earth Day is on the Horizon


Earth Day
 is an international event designed to raise awareness and concern for the environment. Started April 22nd in 1970, it is one of the largest grassroots movements in U.S. history.  C. Crane is fortunate to be based in Fortuna, CA, which is surrounded by state and federally protected areas such as the Headwaters Forest, Pacific Ocean Coastlines, the Eel River and so many more.  With so much abundant beauty it’s no surprise that people here feel strongly about conservation.

Many people in our area and elsewhere faithfully practice sustainability as a way of life. Where every day is Earth Day, so they are constantly looking for ways to reduce dependency on outside resources, and minimize waste. What used to be considered “hippie” counterculture has now worked its way into mainstream

The best thing about Earth Day is that everyone can participate. Take one of our pocket radios along if you are helping with a community project. The CC Solar Observer is a great outdoor radio for listening while you garden to grow food, raise chickens, or work your own sustainability program. Even something as simple as using rechargeable batteries with our Solar Battery Charger can help the environment since they use far less natural resources than disposable batteries.

We’re curious – are you a conservationist, and if so, how?

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Cheatham Grove Grizzly Redwoods State Park

Flashback Friday

Flashback Friday

This is one of the first C. Crane Catalogs ever printed in 1992. Featured on the cover is the Select-A-Tenna and the Sangean 803A.

C. Crane Catalog printed in 1992 with the Select-A-Tenna and Sangean 803A

April is Earthquake Preparedness Month, Are You Ready for the “Big One”?

A two story house collapses during a 6.2 magnitude earthquake

A two story house collapses during a 6.2 magnitude earthquake

As I just drifted off to sleep that Sunday evening, suddenly I heard the wine rack rattling and felt the bed shaking and shifting. I quickly sat up and yelled to my husband “We are having an earthquake!” He calmly said “It’s ok. It will be over soon.” The light fixture continued to sway at least another 45 seconds after it was over. It wasn’t the “Big One” but it was a 6.9 and shook us pretty good. To my amazement the earthquake that struck on March 9th, 2014 didn’t cause severe damage to us here in Humboldt County.

California is not the only state that has the potential of being hit by the “Big One”. This past March Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming was rocked by a 4.8, followed by several aftershocks with magnitudes ranking over 3.0. This past Saturday, April 12th, Oklahoma was hit with over 48 earthquakes larger than a 2.5 magnitude. That same day Idaho was also shook by a 4.9.

These states aren’t the only ones being “rattled”. Chile was struck by a devastating 6.7 quake on March 16th that caused major damage. More than 100,000 people had to briefly evacuate their homes.

The destruction of an earthquake is shocking and not something that can be avoided. You may even think your state, city or town will never see a quake. However, earthquakes are becoming more common and everyone should be prepared for when a catastrophe occurs.

Here are some useful tips for preparing for an Earthquake:
• Create a preparedness kit that will last for (at the very least) 72 hours. Include canned foods, water, a radio, flashlights, batteries, blankets, clothing and shoes, a first aid kit, money, a pipe wrench for turning off the gas and water, and specialty items such as medications, infant food and pet food.

• Know the safest places in each room of your home, such as under a sturdy table or against walls.

• Know the most dangerous places in each room to avoid, such as near windows, mirrors, fireplaces or near any hanging objects.

• Create a plan for where your family will meet if separated during an earthquake.

• Secure your water heater by strapping it to wall studs.

• Know where the gas and water valves are and how to shut them off.

Below are some additional links to information that may help you and your loved ones be prepared. http://www.calema.ca.gov/NewsandMedia/Pages/Current%20News%20and%20Events/Earthquake-Preparedness.aspx

http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/earthquakes/supplies.asp

http://www.redcross.org/images/MEDIA_CustomProductCatalog/m4240216_Earthquake.pdf

 

Flashback Friday

This is a photo of the Original Staff of C. Crane in 1991 at the original C. Crane headquarters in Fortuna, California.

Pictured above: Bob Crane, Sue Crane, Grandma Faye, Katie Kennard, Sue Long, Don Allen and Simon the dog

Pictured above: Bob Crane, Sue Crane, Grandma Faye, Katie Kennard, Sue Long, Don Allen and Simon the dog

How has nationalization of radio affected you or your local radio stations?

On the air?

Live and local or Nationalized?

There was a recent detailed blog post by Edison Research President Larry Rosin that discussed how programming strategies for American commercial radio is changing the face of radio. We know this isn’t news to you and we have experienced it as well. Many of you have told us about getting “news” that is from a town 2 hours a way or a metro area that has no relationship or knowledge of your town. Sometimes it is a format change from News Talk to News Information where there may still be local talent but they aren’t necessarily hosting a show. Other times it’s a full-fledged change where there is no or minimal local staff and that person has little to no influence on the success or failure of the station or what is being broadcast.

One of his points that is interesting, is will this be a boon to stations that actually keep and develop true live and local talent? Is that a selling point for advertisers? Is that a listener loyalty point – would you be more likely to listen to live local talent or do you prefer the syndication or is there a happy medium?

 

Flashback Friday

This is a photo of Annette, our Customer Service Manager and her brother, Bob Laffranchi, owner of local business Loleta Cheese Factory and her other brother Don. They’re on their family dairy in Ferndale, California. Something was pretty funny! We think this is adorable — she’ll probably kill us for posting it!

Annette and brothers on Dairy in Ferndale

Something is HILARIOUS!