The Reviews Are In

We thought you might like to see what others are saying about the CC Pocket Radio. It’s one thing when we tell you what we think, but it’s a whole different story when customers and media give you their feedback. Below are a few highlights.

Customer Reviews:

The Ultimate Travel Radio

This is a great little radio for traveling. Takes up no room in a suit case. You can listen to quality stereo and no matter where you are in the US you can get local weather forecasts at the push of a button.

By W. Young MURFREESBORO, TN

Couldn’t ask for more!

I LOVE my pocket radio. This is my fourth radio I’ve bought from C.Crane. It has great sound quality, is easy to use, long battery life, and I love their idea of having basic instructions printed on the inside of the battery compartment. You can’t go wrong with this rugged little radio!

By J. Scofield Hawthorne, Ca

You can view more reviews on our website or on Amazon.com

Media Review:

Crane CC Pocket Radio

“The CC Pocket is an excellent value… It’s a Walkman-style radio …with a built-in speaker for utility use…this is particularly useful if you use the radio for NOAA Weather Alerts …  The CC Pocket covers standard AM and FM as well as the 7 NOAA Weather Band frequencies and runs on 2 AA batteries. The CC Pocket Radio from C.Crane is a very cool new addition to their catalog.” Read more by RadioJayAllen here: https://radiojayallen.com/c-crane-cc-pocket/

Tell us your favorite feature on the CC Pocket Radio.

 

 

What’s So Great About a Pocket Radio?

Sometimes referred to as a transistor RAD-CCRADIO-CC-PCKTradio, a pocket radio is a small portable receiver that – you guessed it, can fit in a pocket. The capabilities and coverage will vary depending on the manufacturer and the price, but usually a pocket radio will receive the AM and FM bands at a minimum. Some models include more bands like NOAA Weather or Shortwave. Features might include built-in speaker, digital displays, clocks, sleep timers, and memory presets, while others are more basic with analog tuning and earphone operation only.  The transistor radio forged the way for today’s personal music players, proving that technology can be made smaller and designed for individual use.

One thing many people don’t realize is that size does matter when it comes to reception, especially on the AM band. Generally, we wouldn’t recommend a pocket radio when you’re trying to get a weak signal. There are some things that no amount of technology has been able to solve (yet) and one of those things is the radio waves as they relate to the ferrite antenna. This is the internal antenna that receives the AM signal. No matter how you dice it, the longer ferrite antennas will provide better AM reception. FM Reception can also be impacted by length, but in this case it’s the length of the telescopic whip antenna. Most pocket radios do not have a whip antenna, but the cable for your earphones or an FM wire antenna that plugs into the earphone jack can significantly improve FM Reception.

C. Crane has carried some form of pocket radio for over 20 years. Pocket radios become personal companions for many radio listeners; the simplicity and ease of use are often cited as reasons people own one. You will see them on delivery driver’s vehicle dashboards, with people at sporting events (so they can actually hear the play by play action of the radio announcer), or combined with noise-reducing headphones by gardeners and equipment operators. The most common usage seems to be folks out walking or going for a jog. A lesser known popular use of pocket radios is as a bedtime radio. Many people like the auto shutoff or sleep timer features often found on pocket radios. This prevents the drain of batteries with the radio playing after they have fallen to sleep. Many people have sleep issues, so a pocket radio combined with a pillow speaker is the only thing that brings them relief.

It is certainly understandable why these radios continue to be a customer favorite given their ease of use, desirable features, versatility, and compact size.

What the Heck is Airband?

The CC Skywave™ has prompted a lot of curiosity on “what might I hear on Airband?”.

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The primary purpose of Air traffic control worldwide is to prevent collisions, organize and expedite the flow of traffic, and provide information and other support to pilots. It was difficult to find any “history” of airband but it appears that it was first used extensively after World War I and after 1921 at Croydon airport in London.

The Airband radio frequencies play a critical part for all civilian aviation including every flight you have been on. All flights use radio to be cleared for takeoff, landing and changes during the flight to avoid accidents or conflicts. Conversations can be dry, lively, funny or dramatic. We have one customer using the CC Skywave to monitor the ground to pilot communication at the local air races.

Navigation and air traffic control have changed over time and many areas use additional sophisticated systems to help prevent accidents.

According to Wikipedia, Airband, also referred to as Aircraft or Aviation band, is a group of frequencies in the VHF radio spectrum that are allocated to civil aviation radio communications. VHF is a short range, line of site transmission. Our radio covers 118 – 137MHz for Airband. In most countries a license is required to operate airband equipment but that appears to apply only to transceivers, not receivers. In some countries it is illegal to listen to or monitor the Airband without authorization (even in the UK).

The language that is used to communicate on this band can be a challenge to follow. Ken Hoke’s article on Stuff Pilots Say, gives some great insight into the meaning of the seemingly cryptic language used on Airband. His tips on a few basic phrases will really help you understand what is being said. Another great article by Ken is “How Pilots Communicate

Why we decided to include Airband in our radio… Here is Bob Crane’s answer:

“When you are in a big airport you are sometimes subject to the whims of security and circumstance. TSA does a great job but when the process gets a little tense I yearn for more information. I want to know everything that will affect my tiny domain. When you listen to aviation band you can usually figure out more by reading between the lines on what pilots and the control tower are talking about. Sometimes you gain a sense of power and wisdom as you do with any knowledge.”

For more information on what you might hear or how to listen, visit the links below.

http://radio-scanner-guide.com/radioscannerguidepart3c-civilaircraft.htm

http://www.wikihow.com/Listen-to-Your-Local-Air-Traffic-Control

Tell us your best travel story to be entered to win a CC Skywave. One entry per person. Winner will be drawn on March 1st.

Congratulations to Clifford Milner the winner of the CC Skywave Radio!

If you’d like to be extremely entertained, read the comments from last year’s entries about their best airline story https://news.ccrane.com/2015/02/17/what-is-airband-aviation-band-on-a-radio/#comments

Summer is for Travel

beachsummerrevisedWith summer in full swing, we know many of you are on the go. Whether you’re traveling for your bucket list, to visit family or for a little R&R, C. Crane has a few things that you can use to make your travels more enjoyable.

For news and information, the CC Skywave is hard to beat. It will also keep you informed of the weather with weather alerts. It’s the perfect size to stash in your travel bag regardless of your mode of travel. If you want something a little simpler, the CC Pocket might be the right choice. We’ve had several customers who mention using it on the golf course or by the pool.

What fun is the destination without some music? The Senta Ally is a versatile portable Bluetooth Speaker. Use your smartphone with your favorite app to transmit music to the Ally or you can connect a device directly through the line in, or even load your playlist onto an SD card or USB thumb drive. This is great for the lake, on the patio boat, by the pool, at the river or the beach. It’s small enough to easily throw in your towel bag.

Traveling to campgrounds or RV parks that have WiFi or even some hotels – the range isn’t always very good. Use one of our WiFi antennas or the Super WiFi Repeater Kit to get the range you need. We have a great explanation on the different options and how to pick the one that is best suited for your situation.

If camping or hiking is more your style, the Unity Plus LED Flashlight is one of the best or even the Power Vivid Pocket LED Flashlight. Long battery life and easy operation. Everyone will be asking where you got yours. They are an essential part of the camping or hiking pack.

Wherever your summer takes you, we hope you make the most of it!

We love a good story, and you guys have given us some great ones! Vacations are some of the best stories (sometimes for calamity). Tell us your favorite vacation story in the comments and be entered to win any one of the products mentioned above. One entry per person. Drawing will be held August 12th.

Congratulations to Jason Vanderveen who is the winner in our drawing for our blog post Summer is for Travel. Thanks to everyone who participated! ~Jessyca M.  from C. Crane

Insider Insights on the CC Skywave

CC-SKYWAVE_frontWhen traveling I find radio infinitely more satisfying than watching hotel room TV. Hotel radios rarely work at all on AM and figuring out how to run them could be entertaining but I am usually much too tired to find humor in it. Placing the Skywave near or on a window sill always produces acceptable results.

Discovering a good small travel radio can be difficult. Reception and audio are sometimes sub-par because of the small size. The keys and knob can also be difficult to operate (especially at night) for the same reason. We made the Skywave with usability in mind rather than features for “features” sake. Performance is good enough to gain my vote over a $300.00 radio I once traveled with. The only accessory you might want is a Portable Shortwave antenna depending on where you are traveling.

The Skywave is small enough for a trip anywhere in the world. It is easily switched to another country’s format. Two AA batteries last an amazing 70 hours. I love the Skywave for how easy it is to use at night.

All travelers eventually get delayed at an airport. The air band can be a real informer when traveling. The cryptic language used by pilots and air traffic control is very interesting. The word “heavy” is used for an aircraft on approach that is over 300,000 pounds and generates substantial wake turbulence. One time I heard our latest gate number change over the air and my wife and I got to sit in real chairs for the first time in four hours.

When traveling you need a radio to fit into a crevice of a carry on. Having one with top performance makes it wonderful.