Decide for Yourself

We would love to tell you all the reasons you might enjoy the CC Skywave Radio, but our customers are so much better at it.

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Sorensen – Much better than anticipated
Pros: Everything about this little jewel is Pro. I have been using this for past 6 months and nothing has disappointed. I also use to check on aviation weather at local airport before I got to fly our aircraft. As an added bonus the tonal quality is amazing for such a small unit.

Cons: No Cons that I can think of.

Best Uses: Both music and spoken word. Also very good for NOAA weather.

M Mooney – Great Emergency / Travel Radio
This feature packed radio best satisfied my need for an emergency type radio. I live in hurricane and tornado country, so the weather band was a must have feature during power outages. My Skywave arrived the same day as an expensive pair of Marshall earbuds. Although not perfect, the CCrane earbuds trounced the Marshalls in every way. Quality FM stations will have your toes tapping. Problem FM stations aren’t magically transformed into powerhouses…. …Skywave does a fine job with any reasonable signal. I can imagine others would like an external antenna connection. That’s fair, but this IS a pocket radio and not a full feature desktop entertainment system. About the only major item on my wish list for the Skywave would a rubberized Otterbox like case for the inevitable drops that will occur. Overall I am exceptionally pleased with this radio. It easily covers all of my must have features in a well thought out, compact package. I believe it would be the perfect answer for many people.

Pros: Size, Weather Band, Battery Strength Indicator, Signal Strength Indicator, Ability to charge [rechargeable] batteries, Handy Keyboard Lock, Quality Earbuds, Time and Radio Presets retained on battery change

Cons: Average Sensitivity, No AC Adapter, No Batteries, Built-in speaker sound

Best Uses: Beach, Boating, Hunting, Camping, Emergency, Natural Disaster

S Lowry – The Greatest
Went on the wait list for this one to be shipped as soon as available. I’ve had several Grundigs, Kaitos and others, but the Skywave trumps all, especially with the aviation band, battery efficiency, panel layout and more. Look at the other reviews: there are a lot of good reasons for so many 5 stars.

C Stacks – Better then expected! A big smile on my face.
6:30 PM yesterday attached 20 ft long wire and counted 58 readable shortwave stations. Also able to rcv aircraft from several airports with the radio’s antenna. C CRANE please make a Sky II that covers the HF ham frequencies!!!!

Pros: Great Reception on all bands, Does not drift, Speaker does a great job even better with head phones

Cons: None except ssb is missing

Best Uses: With me all the time

H Alexander – The Ultimate Travel Radio
After putting this radio through all the paces, I am convinced that it’s quite possibly the ultimate travel radio! I am particularly impressed with the performance of the AM and SW bands. And I really appreciate the precision offered with the thumbwheel volume control, as well. Thanks for another great product, my 6th purchase from CCrane. I have yet to be disappointed!

Sharonon – Worth it.
Now my father-in-law can listen to his baseball games inside and not have to drive to a clearing on the mountain’s side. Great buy and great price.

C Desmaraison – Buy this radio.
Reception is outstanding. I am in MA and am able to receive Beijing Radio International, Radio Romania and Radio Havana Cuba just to mention a few. I also use their 23 foot clip-on wire antenna to increase reception. Radio is easy use and has many useful features. C.Crane customer service is also outstanding. Buy this radio.

There you have it folks, a wide variety of different users and uses. If you aren’t sure if this is the right radio, contact us and we’d be happy to help you determine which radio is best for you. A good starting point is our article on “Buying the Right Radio for You”. Don’t forget, we offer a no risk 60 day money back guarantee on all of our radios!

It’s Personal

If there is one thing we know about radio, it’s that “It’s personal”. You might already know this or you might be wondering – how can radio that is broadcast to millions of people all day through hundreds of different stations and different shows be personal?

From the selection process of picking the right radio to how and where that radio is used, and what is actually listened to – for each person this process is unique and personal. The radio becomes a companion. In some cases, the voice of camaraderie sharing similar views or vision. In other cases, presenting new compelling ideas that push the listener outside of their previously held beliefs. It can be a teacher. Teaching about gardening, cars or how to get your money or your relationships right. It can join you in the spirit of the game with your fellow fans, like you’re there at the game seeing that pitch or re-living that amazing catch. It’s a place you can belong. Radio is always happy to have you and that makes it very personal.

In an emergency, it can keep you safe. In an election year, it can help you make a decision on how to cast your vote. When you’re traveling it can help you become a part of your destination. When your eyes aren’t working so well, or your health has deteriorated and limited your activity, radio is a friend you can count on to be there day and night. We can listen to the same show and come away with different pieces of information that have an impact on our life. These are just some of the ways it’s personal.

Please share in the comments why radio is personal to you.

What the Heck is Airband?

The CC Skywave™ has prompted a lot of curiosity on “what might I hear on Airband?”.

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The primary purpose of Air traffic control worldwide is to prevent collisions, organize and expedite the flow of traffic, and provide information and other support to pilots. It was difficult to find any “history” of airband but it appears that it was first used extensively after World War I and after 1921 at Croydon airport in London.

The Airband radio frequencies play a critical part for all civilian aviation including every flight you have been on. All flights use radio to be cleared for takeoff, landing and changes during the flight to avoid accidents or conflicts. Conversations can be dry, lively, funny or dramatic. We have one customer using the CC Skywave to monitor the ground to pilot communication at the local air races.

Navigation and air traffic control have changed over time and many areas use additional sophisticated systems to help prevent accidents.

According to Wikipedia, Airband, also referred to as Aircraft or Aviation band, is a group of frequencies in the VHF radio spectrum that are allocated to civil aviation radio communications. VHF is a short range, line of site transmission. Our radio covers 118 – 137MHz for Airband. In most countries a license is required to operate airband equipment but that appears to apply only to transceivers, not receivers. In some countries it is illegal to listen to or monitor the Airband without authorization (even in the UK).

The language that is used to communicate on this band can be a challenge to follow. Ken Hoke’s article on Stuff Pilots Say, gives some great insight into the meaning of the seemingly cryptic language used on Airband. His tips on a few basic phrases will really help you understand what is being said. Another great article by Ken is “How Pilots Communicate

Why we decided to include Airband in our radio… Here is Bob Crane’s answer:

“When you are in a big airport you are sometimes subject to the whims of security and circumstance. TSA does a great job but when the process gets a little tense I yearn for more information. I want to know everything that will affect my tiny domain. When you listen to aviation band you can usually figure out more by reading between the lines on what pilots and the control tower are talking about. Sometimes you gain a sense of power and wisdom as you do with any knowledge.”

For more information on what you might hear or how to listen, visit the links below.

http://radio-scanner-guide.com/radioscannerguidepart3c-civilaircraft.htm

http://www.wikihow.com/Listen-to-Your-Local-Air-Traffic-Control

Tell us your best travel story to be entered to win a CC Skywave. One entry per person. Winner will be drawn on March 1st.

Congratulations to Clifford Milner the winner of the CC Skywave Radio!

If you’d like to be extremely entertained, read the comments from last year’s entries about their best airline story https://news.ccrane.com/2015/02/17/what-is-airband-aviation-band-on-a-radio/#comments

Let’s Celebrate World Radio!

World Radio Day is held annually on February 13th. What a great concept! C. Crane loves radio and since this happens to correspond with Valentine’s Day, we can’t think of any better way to celebrate our first love!

2016’s World Radio Day theme is “Radio in Times of Emergency and Disaster”. C. Crane definitely understands the power of radio especially in times of emergency and disaster. This is why so many of our radios have the weather band and several have the weather alert option. Various models of emergency radios have been part of the C. Crane product line since 1998. The first rendition was the Baygen Freeplay Radio.

The world's first clockwork radio. It has three bands (MW, SW and FM) and needs no batteries, the power source being an internal spring-driven generator powered by hand. The brainchild of Trevor Baylis, the inventor of the Baylis generator, the radio was developed with funding from the British Overseas Development Administration. It was primarily aimed at people in developing countries where affordable energy sources are scarce or non-existent. Winding the handle for twenty-five seconds gives over 30 minutes listening time.This radio was one of the very first wind up radios on the market with satisfactory reception and audio. The timing of the product release coincided with some of the worst storms the US had seen in years.  Y2K was also on the horizon and people felt  they could not be too prepared for what might be in store.  At the same time, LED bulbs made their debut, which we added to the Baygen Freeplay Radio.  Their long battery life and LED bulbs that didn’t burn out or break made these flashlights a must have.

We’ve come a long way since those days and so have our radios. Emergency readiness and products that support disaster preparedness still hold a special place with C. Crane and so many of our customers. During hurricane Sandy several customers let us know how important their radios were in giving them a sense of security.  Since many cars were washed away or under water, and power was out for several days,  their C. Crane radio was the only way these storm victims could charge cell phones or get any information. With storms hitting all over the country, please take the time to check your radios and flashlights and make sure your emergency plans and kits are up to date.

While we love the idea of setting aside a special day to acknowledge World Radio Day, here at C. Crane every day is a radio day and we know for many of you that’s the case as well. Cheers to celebrating World Radio Day with you in spirit while tuning in to listen to this great medium called radio!

To read some of our previous blog posts on emergency preparedness https://news.ccrane.com/?s=emergency

Learn more about NOAA.